Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland

ISBN: 9780307279286 | BUY HERE
Not a story for anyone who wants a light read. In fact, the book should be labelled with a commitment sticker. It charts the murder of Jean McConville, a widowed mother in Northern Ireland. McConville is taken away by a group from her home, in front of her young children. She is never seen again. Besides the harrowing tale of what happened to her and her family after her disappearance, we also find out the identities of those who formed and supported the IRA in its formative years. This should be recommended reading for World History Classes. It keeps you captive under the very end.

FROM THE PUBLISHER

WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FOR NONFICTION

NEW YORK TIMES TOP TEN BOOK OF THE YEARLONGLISTED FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARDWINNER OF THE ORWELL PRIZE

BEST NONFICTION BOOK OF THE YEAR – TIME MAGAZINE

WASHINGTON POST TOP TEN BOOK OF THE YEAR

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

Named a best book of the year by The Wall Street JournalEWThe EconomistThe Chicago TribuneGQSlate, NPR, VarietySlateTIMEMinneapolis Star TribuneSt. Louis Post DispatchThe Dallas Morning NewsBuzzfeedKirkus Reviews, and BookPage

Named a best book of the decade by Literary Hub and EW

“Masked intruders dragged Jean McConville, a 38-year-old widow and mother of 10, from her Belfast home in 1972. In this meticulously reported book — as finely paced as a novel — Keefe uses McConville’s murder as a prism to tell the history of the Troubles in Northern Ireland. Interviewing people on both sides of the conflict, he transforms the tragic damage and waste of the era into a searing, utterly gripping saga.” – New York Times Book Review, Ten Best Books of the Year

From award-winning New Yorker staff writer Patrick Radden Keefe, a stunning, intricate narrative about a notorious killing in Northern Ireland and its devastating repercussions.

December 1972, Jean McConville, a thirty-eight-year-old mother of ten, was dragged from her Belfast home by masked intruders, her children clinging to her legs. They never saw her again. Her abduction was one of the most notorious episodes of the vicious conflict known as The Troubles. Everyone in the neighborhood knew the I.R.A. was responsible. But in a climate of fear and paranoia, no one would speak of it. In 2003, five years after an accord brought an uneasy peace to Northern Ireland, a set of human bones was discovered on a beach. McConville’s children knew it was their mother when they were told a blue safety pin was attached to the dress–with so many kids, she had always kept it handy for diapers or ripped clothes.

Patrick Radden Keefe’s mesmerizing book on the bitter conflict in Northern Ireland and its aftermath uses the McConville case as a starting point for the tale of a society wracked by a violent guerrilla war, a war whose consequences have never been reckoned with. The brutal violence seared not only people like the McConville children, but also I.R.A. members embittered by a peace that fell far short of the goal of a united Ireland, and left them wondering whether the killings they committed were not justified acts of war, but simple murders. From radical and impetuous I.R.A. terrorists such as Dolours Price, who, when she was barely out of her teens, was already planting bombs in London and targeting informers for execution, to the ferocious I.R.A. mastermind known as The Dark, to the spy games and dirty schemes of the British Army, to Gerry Adams, who negotiated the peace but betrayed his hardcore comrades by denying his I.R.A. past– Say Nothing conjures a world of passion, betrayal, vengeance, and anguish.

Georgette Coan
Georgette Coan is the manager of Barbara's Bookstore at Hawthorn Mall in Vernon Hills, IL. She began working for Barbara's in 2010 and was the manager at Barbara's in Burr Ridge, IL. Georgette believes that people still buy paper books because they long for the feel of a physical volume in their hands, actual books on their bookshelves at home, a way to have an actual library (you can't wrap an E-reader!) to pass onto their families. "Books harken back to a more nostalgic era. This new technology isn't for everyone; physical copies of books still offer another choice to those who don't care for the newfangled technology known as E-books and E-readers."